BIG NEWS: Comic Book Apocalypse, a Jack Kirby Exhibition in Los Angeles!

Splash from Silver Surfer #18 (Sept. 1970), by Kirby & Herb Trimpe, adapted by Louis Solis

From Silver Surfer #18 (Sept. 1970), by Kirby and Herb Trimpe (RIP), adapted by Louis Solis

A major Jack Kirby exhibition in Los Angeles, curated by Charles Hatfield, the author of Hand of Fire!

California State University, Northridge Art Galleries

August 24 to October 10, 2015

Public reception:
Saturday, Aug. 29, 4-7pm

Curator talk:
Monday, Aug. 31, 10am

Panel discussion:
Saturday, Sept. 26, 1pm

ONE OF THE BIGGEST EXHIBITIONS OF KIRBY’S WORK EVER!

I’m proud to announce that the CSU Northridge Art Galleries will be presenting, this Fall semester, the exhibition Comic Book Apocalypse: The Graphic World of Jack Kirby. This show will consist of roughly a hundred original artworks by the King, with a focus on his comics in the late 1960s and in the 70s (but also including works from the 1940s-50s and the 80s). Curating this show has been a dream come true.

Comic Book Apocalypse will highlight Jack’s penchant for superheroes, myth fantasy, and science fiction, along with his visions of the cosmic, the primitive, and the futuristic—and of course dazzling examples of “Kirbytech.” From The Fantastic Four and Thor to The Fourth World, Kamandi, 2001, and Silver Star, this show will capture some of Jack’s grandest themes and images. The exhibition will include two complete comic book stories, a great many more comic book pages and spreads, a handful of Jack’s signature collages, and a couple of images never published in his lifetime.

To celebrate this show, we at CSUN will hold three special events within the Gallery. First will be an opening reception on Saturday evening, August 29—a chance to see and chat about the show in the company of other fans! Then I’ll give a gallery talk two days later, on Monday morning, Aug. 31. Finally, we’ll hold a panel discussion with artists and scholars on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 26. All these events are free and open to the public!

Comic Book Apocalypse will be the first solo Kirby exhibition at a university, and one of the largest Kirby shows yet assembled (comparable in scale to the Words & Pictures Museum show in 1994, and exceeded only by the Fumetto show in Switzerland in 2010). In fact it may be the biggest Kirby exhibition yet mounted in the US—and I hope it will inspire other shows and tributes to Jack over these next couple of years, leading up to his centennial (2017).

Curating this show has been, again, a waking dream for me, both a sequel to Hand of Fire and a plunge into a new way of working. It couldn’t have happened without the support of CSU Northridge’s Mike Curb College of Arts, Media, and Communication, the CSUN College of Humanities, and the CSUN Art Galleries program, the help of Mark Evanier and the Jack Kirby Museum & Research Center, and the generosity of many Kirby collectors.

Comic Book Apocalypse opens in time for the launch of the Fall 2015 semester at CSUN, and will be up for seven weeks. It will include a Kirby collage by Geoff (Jetpack Jr.) Grogan , and will be accompanied by a lavishly illustrated catalog featuring some twenty essays about Jack’s work, co-edited by me and Prof. Ben Saunders of the University of Oregon. This companion book will feature a once-in-a-lifetime mix of comics creators, media professionals, and scholars! (Check back here in the weeks ahead for more details about the catalog.)

This exhibition will kick off a year of comics studies events at CSU Northridge, including a conference in Spring 2016. For a decade now, CSUN has run a very popular course on comics that I founded, and I believe now is the time to trumpet (and expand) our commitment to this vibrant, fast-growing field of study!

I can’t think of a better way of doing that than exhibiting the work of the great Jack Kirby. Readers, I hope you can come out and see the show!

NOTE:

If you’re attending Comic-Con International in San Diego this week, do come to the Annual Jack Kirby Tribute Panel assembled and moderated by Mark Evanier. That’s happening on Sunday morning, July 12, from 10:00 to 11:15 a.m. in Room 5AB. It’s a great tradition. I’ll be announcing Comic Book Apocalypse there! Also, drop by the booth of the Jack Kirby Museum & Research Center—that’s by Lobby B1 in the main Exhibit Hall, in the Gold and Silver Pavilion (see this map). I may see you there.

Talking Kirby at ZAPPCON!

Her name is Zapp!

This weekend I’m in Fresno, CA, presenting and signing books at ZAPPCON Year One: the first go-round for what promises to be an annual Central Valley comics/gaming/cosplay/fan culture convention. Thanks to my brother Scott Hatfield, who brought me on board, my wife Michele Hatfield, who makes everything better, my collaborator Alison Mandaville of Fresno State, who will be joining me at the podium tomorrow, and ZAPPCON’s David Holland, who scheduled my appearances and made it possible for Scott and I to arrange our exhibitors’ table!

ZAPPCON is happening at the Convention Center’s Valdez Hall. Tomorrow, Sunday, Oct. 19, I’ll be signing at our “Educators’ Corner” table on the exhibitors’ floor between 10am and 4pm, except when I’m doing these panels:

10:30-11:30am: The Superhero Reborn—or, How Jack Kirby Co-Authored the Marvel Universe (and More) from His Drawing Board (Sanger Room)

1:30-2:45pm: Comics in the Creative Classroom: Students and Teachers Doing Things with Comics (Sanger Room)—a roundtable with Alison Mandaville (CSU Fresno), John Beynon (CSU Fresno), Jennifer Crow (Arne Nixon Center for the Study of Children’s Literature), Josh Walker (Coalinga Middle School), and me.

If you’re at ZAPPCON, why not take in these events, and/or drop by our table to talk comics, Kirby, education, the works? Today, Saturday, was a blast, and tomorrow promises to be even more so!

The Kirbys and Marvel Reach a Settlement

Detail from the cover to Avengers #12 (Jan. 1965), drawn by Jack Kirby, inked by Chic Stone, colored by Stan Goldberg

Wow.

Marvel and the family of Jack Kirby have amicably resolved their legal disputes, and are looking forward to advancing their shared goal of honoring Mr. Kirby’s significant role in Marvel’s history.

Two days ago, on Friday, September 26, Marvel Entertainment and the Kirby estate jointly released the above statement—which is the sum total of what we know about a last-minute legal settlement, reached just days before the Supreme Court of the United States was slated to consider the Marvel v. Kirby case in private conference.

This is a startling piece of news for those who care about comics and about Kirby. I could feel my own pulse racing—literally, I’m not being hyperbolic—when I first read the news.

What the settlement may mean remains a matter of guesswork and hope. If it works for the Kirby family, though, then the news is good. My hope is that the Kirby family will gain security and comfort from the settlement, and that Marvel’s official line about its history will come closer to acknowledging the truth about Kirby’s essential contribution to the company. I hope this will lead to more honest conversations about how Marvel Comics got made, that Kirby’s story will become an official part of Marvel’s story, and that his name will be forever attached to the company’s marquee properties, going forward. That’s my fervent hope.

The case has been long and complicated, dating back to copyright termination notices filed by the Kirbys in 2009, which sparked a suit from Marvel and a countersuit by the Kirbys. In July 2011 the US District Court for the Southern District of New York found in favor of Marvel, rejecting the Kirbys’ case. In August 2014 the Second Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirmed that decision, again handing down an opinion that favored Marvel. Last October the Second Circuit rejected a request to rehear the case, after which the Kirbys’ attorney Marc Toberoff submitted their cert petition to SCOTUS on March 21. Yet many observers felt that this would not be enough to counter the judgment of the Second Circuit; SCOTUS grants few cert petitions, and the Kirbys’  was widely seen as a gesture of last resort: a last-ditch, Hail Mary pass in spite of the fact that the matter had been firmly settled in Marvel’s favor. It appeared to many that the case was done and that the Kirbys had simply been beaten.

However, news of the cert petition reignited publicity over the case, and in May SCOTUS discussed the case in conference, after which the Court requested a response from Marvel. Then, in June, things started to happen: several important amici curiae briefs supporting the Kirbys’ petition brought high-profile attention to the case. One of these was filed on behalf of Kirby biographer Mark Evanier, Jack Kirby Collector publisher and editor John Morrow, and the PEN Center USA (a nonprofit representing diverse writers). In addition, the California Society of Entertainment Lawyers filed a brief.

Another brief that became very important for the press coverage of the  case was submitted by Bruce Lehman, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce and Director of the US Patent and Trademark Office, and an authority on intellectual property law. Lehman filed in collaboration with former US register of copyrights Ralph Oman, the Artists Rights Society, and the International Intellectual Property Institute; they were joined by the American Society of Illustrators, the National Cartoonists Society, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists, and other organizations representing arts professionals—as well as scores of cartoonists and illustrators who also signed on.

The Hollywood Reporter‘s Eriq Gardner published an illuminating article on the Lehman and Evanier briefs, including the complete text of both, on June 19.

Another piece of big news was the brief filed by three film industry unions, SAG-AFTRA, the Directors Guild of America, and the Writers Guild of America. The unions’ support of the Kirbys’ petition made the case a Hollywood headliner. Clearly creators in many other fields besides comic books saw the ramifications of a case regarding freelance creators, work for hire law, the so-called “Instance and Expense” test invoked by the Second Circuit, and the termination rights of creators and estates. At issue were questions fundamental to IP and work for hire law. Again, Hollywood Reporter‘s Eriq Gardner spotlighted the legal implications in a helpful article, dated June 23.

Marvel, as SCOTUS requested, filed its brief in opposition to the cert petition on July 14. Marvel’s brief sought to discredit all the amici curiae briefs in support of the Kirbys. The Kirbys’ attorneys responded with a reply brief on July 29, setting the stage for a further SCOTUS conference that was to happen on Monday, Sept. 29 (tomorrow, as of this writing). The Case Page on the SCOTUS blog spells out the whole timeline from last December to now, and includes PDFs of the cert petition and all the briefs.

Marvel and the Kirbys’ eleventh-hour settlement—just as SCOTUS was poised to decide whether to take up the case—has been interpreted by some as an admission on Marvel’s part that the Kirbys’ case was stronger than they first allowed. It does seem reasonable to infer that Marvel was incented to settle before things got more complicated, or hazardous, for them. Yet the fact that the case never came to trial (the original 2011 decision was a summary judgment, not a trial verdict) makes it hard to know just what the calculations were on both sides. Interpreting the result as an unalloyed triumph or affirmation for either side would probably be too big a leap. Again, nothing is yet known publicly beyond the official joint statement: a single sentence.

News coverage all over the place hasn’t really added to the sum total of what we know. For the record, I consulted online articles from The Hollywood Reporter (Eriq Gardner again), Variety, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal (a quick AP wire), the Los Angeles TimesHero Complex blog, Deadline, and many different comics news sites, notably Comics Alliance and The Comics Reporter. It was at The Beat that I first read the news.

Ryan Carey provides a somewhat astringent (glass half empty?) analysis of what the news means over at Geeky Universe. I think he’s mistaken about fan and freelancer pressure not making a difference in the case, but, still, what he has to say is bracing and worth the read.

Me, I’d like to quote what Tom Spurgeon says in The Comics Reporter article linked above:

Exploitation can be mitigated. Better outcomes can be sought. Credit can be shared. The world doesn’t end.

But also this sobering afterthought:

Still, this wasn’t easily won; this settlement came with significant personal and professional cost spread out across generations. The negative example remains.

Damn right. And yet it feels to me as if something important and good has happened.

Some will be disappointed that Marvel v. Kirby did not get to trial and did not become the supreme test case of work for hire law that it might have; some might have preferred for the Kirby family to take the case all the way to court, so as to bring greater clarity to that kind of law, perhaps even to effect a revolution in the law. Surely some of the those entities that submitted or signed on to the amici briefs wanted to see a trial outcome that would in effect rewrite that body of law. Yet I have to believe that the family and their counsel acted wisely in negotiating the settlement, and that it will help the Kirbys—my chief concern. Congratulations to them for sticking it out and getting Marvel to the bargaining table.

I look forward to hearing more about the terms of the settlement—and, I hope, to seeing Jack Kirby’s name highlighted at Marvel from here on out!

I will need to update my Marvel v. Kirby page. I’m glad about that. :)

 

 

 

RIP Stan Goldberg (1932-2014)

Stan Goldberg, Addanaccity, 2012

Stan Goldberg at the Cincinnati Comic Expo, 2012. Photo by Bearman, from George Ford’s addanaccity.com.

I’m saddened to report that veteran cartoonist and colorist Stan Goldberg has passed away. Mark Evanier has the news, here. As I reported on August 20, Mr. Goldberg suffered a stroke about two weeks back and had entered hospice care.

I met Stan only once, on the dais at the San Diego Comic-Con a couple of years back. He was a charming, affable man with deep, sweet memories of working in the comic book biz. His work is important to the history of comics, and graced many, many comic books, particularly at Archie and Marvel. I am sorry to learn of his passing, and extend my condolences to his loved ones.

RIP, Stan Goldberg, comics artist. If in my mind I see the world in Marvel Comics colors, what I see is because of him.

Kirby Day: What a Blast!

Kirby4Heroes

Two days ago, Thursday, August 28, was Kirby Day—that is, Jack Kirby’s birthday. It brought a delightful outpouring of remembrance and appreciation that spilled over into Friday. The Kirby4Heroes campaign took the occasion to raise money for The Hero Initiative—I hope they were able to raise a lot!

It’s never too late to donate to The Hero Initiative. :)

I was glad to contribute to Kirby Day in my own small way: with a posting at Acts of Geek (also run here on my blog), and by taking part in the big two-part (one, two) celebration over at Comics Alliance.

I went a little Twitter crazy on the 28th, tweeting links to online examples of top-notch Kirby scholarship, Kirby appreciation, and Kirbyana. For the record, here are the things I linked to (besides those mentioned above):

Requiem for Jack Kirby (2001)

Of course I also followed the #WakeUpAndDraw campaign on Twitter, which you see here:

(Dig this Hollywood Reporter article about #WakeUpAndDraw!)

Congratulations to Jillian Kirby and her family for leading the charge on Kirby Day! As far as I’m concerned, it’s now a genuine holiday. :)